ABVT In The News

ABVT marks 50-year milestone

American Board of Veterinary Toxicology celebrates history of safeguarding animals, people, and the environment

2017 marked the 50th anniversary of the American Board of Veterinary Toxicology, the first professional organization to certify toxicology experts. Since the AVMA granted provisional status to the fledgling specialty in 1967, the ABVT has certified more than a hundred diplomates, most of whom still work in academia and for veterinary diagnostic laboratories, poison control centers, government agencies, industry, and private consulting firms. For a half-century, ABVT diplomates have educated the public, private practice veterinarians, and veterinary students about toxicological hazards to pets, livestock, wildlife, and the environment. The AVMA granted full recognition as a veterinary specialty to the ABVT in 1970.

 

The ABVT’s objectives are to advance education and scientific progress in veterinary toxicology and to encourage continued educational training and research among those engaged in the organization. The organization ensures through its certification examination that competent veterinary toxicologists are available for veterinary teaching institutions, veterinary diagnostic laboratories, industry, government, the military, research, private practice, public health, and the environmental sciences.  Field veterinarians, physicians, regulatory agencies, animal scientists, lawyers, laypersons, and other professional organizations recognize the expertise of ABVT diplomates and routinely consult with them on a broad range of toxicological problems.

 

For more information see: AVMA.



In Memoriam

The ABVT has lost several members during the past two years.  Each of these individuals contributed to our organization and veterinary medicine at large.  Each of these individuals also served as President of the ABVT.

William “Bill” Buck (1933-2018):  Dr. Buck graduated with a doctor of veterinary medicine degree from the University of Missouri, Columbia, in 1956. He became a professor of veterinary toxicology at Iowa State University and Mississippi State University, and professor emeritus at University of Illinois. Dr. Buck developed veterinary toxicology programs at Iowa State University and the University of Illinois during his career. His legacy is the National Animal Poison Control Center, now known as the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, developed at the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana. Dr. Buck was among the very first cohort to take the ABVT certification examination.

Frederick W. "Fred" Oehme (1933-2018):  Dr. Oehme graduated with a doctor of veterinary medicine degree from Cornell University, in 1958. After receiving his DVM, Dr. Oehme went to work at a private practice in Maryland for a year. While earning his master's degree at Kansas State University, he worked as an assistant and associate professor in clinical medicine from 1959 to 1966. During his time at Kansas State University Dr. Oehme was a visiting professor at the Justus Liebig University-Giessen in Germany. In 1966, Dr. Oehme went to the University of Missouri for three years to work on his doctorate. He returned to Kansas State University in 1969 as the director of comparative toxicology laboratories and held this position until his retirement in 2009.  Dr. Oehme was also a member of the first cohort to take the ABVT certification examination.

Eugene Lloyd (1924-2017):  Dr. Lloyd graduated with a doctor of veterinary medicine degree from Iowa State University, in 1949.  After receiving his DVM, Dr. Lloyd worked in private practice in Iowa and while in practice started Vet-A-Mix, the first of several companies he formed.  He went on to receive his Ph.D. from Iowa State University. He was a professor of pathology and toxicology at Iowa State University, from 1972 until 1992. It was also in the 1990s that Lloyd founded Lloyd Laboratories, an addition to Vet-A-Mix.  A longtime supporter of his alma mater, Dr. Lloyd and his wife, Linda, built the W. Eugene and Linda R. Lloyd Endowed Professorship in Veterinary Medicine and Lloyd Fund for Veterinary Medicine, as well as contributed $3.5 million to a new teaching hospital at Iowa State University, the Dr. W. Eugene and Linda Lloyd Veterinary Medical Center in 2006.


                                                           Congratulations

ABVT Diplomate Birgit Puschner named new dean of Michigan State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine:

Dr. Puschner was formerly professor and chair of the Department of Molecular Biosciences in the School of Veterinary Medicine at University of California, Davis. After completing her residency in veterinary toxicology in 1999, Puschner joined the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine faculty. She previously served as professor of clinical veterinary toxicology and professor of toxicology at the school. She also worked as a diagnostic veterinary toxicologist for more than a decade for the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, with the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

 

ABVT Diplomate Frank Galey named new Executive Vice President and Provost of Utah State University:

Dr. Galey was formerly Dean of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Wyoming. Earlier in his career, Dr. Galey was Director of the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory, and teaching and administrative posts at both the University of California at Davis and the University of Illinois.  Dr. Galey earned a bachelor’s in veterinary medicine from Colorado State University in 1981 and a doctor of veterinary medicine at CSU two years later. He earned a doctorate in veterinary biosciences from the University of Illinois in 1988. 


ABVT Profiles Series Documentary

The ABVT was the subject of a Profiles Series documentary film describing the impact of the organization on veterinary medicine and human health. You can view the videos here. The Profiles Series was hosted by Louis Gossett Jr. and is an award winning television series dedicated to showcasing the most important issues of the day. The film originally aired on cable networks (CNBC, Bravo, etc.) as educational programming and on the US Government’s Voice of America Television and as digital video on this website and on YouTube.